When performing the same job year in and year out, it’s easy to become content in your role or company. You know the dynamics, you understand the expectations, and you are comfortable with the organization as a whole. But what if it’s time to move on? How do you know when is the right time? Does a certain event happen, or not happen? Is there a sudden moment when the feeling is right?

Let’s break down how you can know when it may be time to move on from your current company.

You’re Stagnant
A major benefit to working in a corporate environment is the ability to advance, whether through your skills and responsibilities, or position. If you’ve noticed that there has been zero growth in any of these areas for the past several months, or even years, it may be time to consider moving on.

However, do note that stagnation doesn’t always have to be solved with an exit. Schedule some time with your leader to let them know that you are ready to take on additional or different responsibilities and share with them your career goals. There is a chance that because you haven’t voiced your desire for change, they are assuming you prefer things how they are.

There’s Constant Attrition
Companies experience highs and lows with their retention rates. Some years, everyone wants to work at a certain organization, and other years, that same organization may struggle to keep employees happy. However, if you’re noticing a consistent pattern of co-workers leaving the company for other opportunities, that may mean it’s time to pause and consider a change for yourself. Most of the time, if large amounts of employees are leaving the company, that means that there are better opportunities elsewhere.

If you’re have strong relationships with co-workers who are saying goodbye, sit down with them (preferably out of the office) and respectfully pick their brain as the why they’ve decided the company is no longer the right fit for them. Who knows, their reasons may solidify your decision to stay, or, you may recognize your desire for change as well.

You’re Having More Bad Days Than Good Ones
Work is called work for a reason. It’s not always supposed to be fun, easy, or something that you’d want to do in your free time. However, it should be relatively enjoyable, and something that you have some interest in. If you’re realizing that every day is draining, upsetting, or burdensome, it’s time to move on. While work isn’t always a walk in the park, it shouldn’t be severely affecting your quality of life.

You Simply Want To
There doesn’t always have to be a major reason to desire moving into a different company. Sometimes there’s simply an itch, and it’s okay to follow that feeling. Take your time and look around to see what’s out there. However, do not share with your employer (or anyone at your company if you can) that you are looking around at other opportunities. That is a sure-fire way to lose out on potential promotions, raises, or even your own job before you have another plan in place.

There isn’t a simple answer if you are questioning when it’s time to move on. However, if the thought has crossed your mind, it may be time to explore and simply see what exists out there.

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About Debi
Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

Ready to take your career to the next level?
Let’s chat. Schedule a call to discuss innovative solutions to your specific needs.

No matter your industry, being involved in a mentoring relationship is crucial to your understanding of your work and of others: both as a mentor and a mentee. However, establishing a mentoring relationship can be a bit tricky. Asking someone to be your mentor, or accepting someone’s invitation to be a mentor can weirdly feel similar to a first date. What if they say no? What are we going to talk about? Is this the first of many meetings?

Never fear, a mentorship can be an amazing way for a mentee to grow in their career, and a seasoned mentor to give back and advocate for someone just starting out. With a little guidance, setting up a successful mentoring relationship can be rewarding, exciting, and fun!

How to Find a Mentor
First, let’s talk to the individuals looking for a mentor. If you’re reading this, chances are this is your first mentorship, and you may be a bit lost on how to find and establish a relationship with your mentor.

1. Firstly, you need to identify an individual that you highly respect and admire within your circle. This individual should be a bit further along in their career, be a positive role model, and be in a place where they can adequately dedicate time to being a mentor.

2. Once you’ve identified your mentor, prepare yourself for the ask. Asking someone to be your mentor is more than just a “Hi, can you mentor me?” request. Before you ask them, you need to be ready to tell them why you want them to be your mentor and what you would expect from the relationship. As the mentee, it is your responsibility to establish the pace, communication, and expectations of the relationship. Remember, your mentor is doing you a favor here, you need to treat them with the courtesy they deserve.

3. Next, schedule some time with the individual to inquire about if they’d be willing to mentor you. Let them know why you’d like them to mentor you, what you’re looking for out of a mentorship, and what style/frequency of communication you’re looking for. If they’re up for it, then congratulations! You’ve found your mentor!

4. Lastly, work on setting up a framework for the relationship. How often will you meet? Where will you meet? Will there be an agenda for conversations? Will you be wanting feedback, advice, or advocacy? Share the structure with your mentor and get their thoughts. If they’re on board, then your all set!

How to Be a Great Mentor
If you’ve been approached to mentor a friend, colleague, or someone else, congratulations to you! Clearly, you’ve demonstrated a quality that the mentee values, and they want someone like you to pour into their lives.

While much of a mentorship relationship is the mentee’s responsibility, it’s vital that you provide a few key elements to foster a strong, engaging, and worthwhile relationship.

1. Ensure that you have adequate time to dedicate to the mentorship. If you’re constantly overwhelmed and stretched thin, this may not be the proper time to mentor someone.

2. Be a positive role model. How would you want your mentee to behave and make decisions? Be sure that you are displaying those qualities in your everyday life. Your choices and actions are clearly of value to your mentee, so ensure that you are making positive ones.

3. Listen, but don’t make decisions. More than likely, much of your mentorship role will be listening to your mentee walk through decisions, choices, and trying to understand what they should do. As a seasoned mentor, it’s tempting to simply tell your mentee what to do. However, keep in mind that while you can offer up suggestions or help them process, decisions need to be made by them. This builds self-confidence and personality responsibility in your mentee.

4. Lastly, remember who mentored you. What did you like about that relationship? What did you not like? How did they help shape you into who you are today? A mentor is a pivotal individual who can build up a person beyond what that person thought was possible. Be the mentor you had, or would have wanted to have.

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About Debi
Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

Ready to take your career to the next level?
Let’s chat. Schedule a call to discuss innovative solutions to your specific needs.

While the workplace often provides excellent opportunities for collaboration, teamwork, and unity, the occasional conflict does occur. As frustrating as it is, conflict can lead to better self-awareness and understanding of those around us. It’s all in how we handle the confrontation.

 

In this post, let’s walk through the right way to confront a coworker in a way that’s positive, respectful, and professional.

 

Determine if Confrontation is Necessary

First and foremost, it’s important to determine if a confrontation is even necessary. As easy as it can be to assume the worst, it’s vital that you first offer up the benefit of the doubt. For example, was a coworker late to an important meeting, causing you additional stress while you scrambled to stall the customer? Before assuming they were getting a latte or chose to sleep in, take a moment to consider the possibility that something happened that was out of their control. Was there an emergency at home? Did they get caught up in out-of-nowhere traffic? Also consider their track record. Is this a common reoccurrence for them, or was it a one-time situation? If the offense is small and is out of the ordinary, a confrontation isn’t necessary. If this is an on-going problem, go ahead and schedule some time to chat with the coworker.

 

Do It In Person

When facing confrontation, it’s tempting to hide behind an email. However, let me caution you: sending an email instead of talking in person can: 1) Skew how the reader interprets the message because you can’t hear someone’s tone over email. 2) Risk additional individuals becoming aware of the conversation (whether you can see them or not) through forwarding and blind-copying. 3) Honestly, make you appear a bit cowardly because you aren’t facing the problem head on.

 

The conversation doesn’t have to be intense or long, and no, you don’t have to send a calendar invitation. Simply approach the co-worker and let them know that you’d like to have a quick conversation, and tell them the place and time. An easy, “Hey Emily! I’d like to grab a minute with you to discuss what happened earlier. Are you available for 10 minutes at the end of lunch? I can grab us a coordination room so we have some privacy” works great.

 

Take Out the Emotion

We aren’t robots, and it’s okay to share if you were hurt or frustrated by something a coworker did. But when confronting a coworker, try to keep the conversation on the facts. If you start bringing in your feelings and opinions, it’s easy to go a bit overboard into your emotions instead of what actually happened. This lets both you and the coworker know what went wrong, what needs to be fixed, and what can be done moving forward.

 

Let it Go

Let’s face it, holding a grudge makes us feel powerful. However, it benefits no one for you to stew with your thoughts. If the conversation with your coworker has happened, both parties understand each other’s feelings, and any necessary apologies or plans for future situations have been completed, then it’s time to let it go. People aren’t perfect, and in the same way that you’re going to wrong your coworkers sometimes, they’re also going to wrong you. Focus on proper communication to ensure that these conflicts are far and few between, and then let past issues go.

 

Confrontation can be scary, and can sometimes have negative effects not just on the individual you’re confronting, but on you as well.  But if you focus on these key steps with the intention to better improve relations, you will be on the right track.

 

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About Debi

Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

 

Ready to take your career to the next level? 

Let’s chat. Schedule a complimentary call to discuss innovative solutions to your specific needs.

As companies are determining whether to bring folks back to the office, devise a hybrid plan or allow employees to permanently work remotely, some type of remote work is likely here to stay. Love it or hate it, working remotely creates the opportunity to approach thinking about your career differently. How do you set boundaries with work hours? How do you stay engaged with co-workers in a virtual environment? Can you wear sweatpants all day now?

 

Working remotely looks a little different for everyone; however, there are a few key things to keep in mind. Read on to learn our top tips for successfully working remotely.

 

Embrace Technology

If you’re going to work remotely, you’re going to have to be comfortable with technology. By now, almost all companies who’ve created a work from home policy have implemented some sort of technology that allows for internal communications. Whether your team uses Teams, Slack, or another communication software, spend some time really exploring how the program works. Ensure that you know all of the capabilities so that you can use the system to its fullest potential.

 

Stay Consistent

As easy as it is to just groggily bring your laptop to your bed in the mornings, take time each day to get up, carry out your hygiene tasks, get dressed it whatever way is most comfortably productive to you, and sit up at a desk or table. Having a consistent routine helps your mind and body understand when you are in work mode vs. relaxation mode. Unless you’re in on-camera meetings (in which case, you should be dressed as if you were in the office unless told otherwise.), dress comfortably but not slouchy. It’s easy to want to wear the same baggy sweatpants day in and day out, but keeping a polished appearance helps you feel better, and in turn, work better.

 

Set Boundaries

As nice as it is to no longer experience commuting, working remotely can make it difficult to “un-plug” once the workday is over. Because your home is now your office, choosing to not check your email or accept a late meeting outside of work hours can be tough. Have a conversation with your leader to inquire about mutual expectations for working hours. Do they expect you to respond to a Teams message after the workday has ended? What is their policy on attending meetings scheduled outside of work hours? Does a 6am meeting mean an earlier log-off? When it comes to boundaries, communication is key.

 

Make Effort

Lastly, be sure to make effort in your relationships with co-workers. As great as technology is, there is nothing like having face-to-face conversations. Try to schedule in-person team events here and there, even something as simple as a lunch or happy hour. Or if everyone is scattered across the country, perhaps a yearly meet up. Face to face interaction reminds us that there is a person behind the email address.

 

Finding an efficient and effective way to work remotely is not a one size fits all situation. Look carefully about what works for you and the team. While many welcome this new paradigm shift in what society has determined to be an appropriate workplace, it’s not for everyone. If you have found that you just don’t like remote work, try meeting up with co-workers, take up a co-working space or start looking for opportunities with a traditional in person set up.

 

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About Debi

Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

 

Ready to take your career to the next level? 
Let’s chat. Schedule a complimentary call to discuss innovative solutions to your specific needs.

Many want to be in charge, but only few truly have (or develop) what it takes to be a successful leader. The top skill necessary to move into leadership isn’t technical abilities, polished customer communication, or savvy strategic understanding. It’s resiliency. More often than not, leaders face pushbacks and less than ideal situations. In addition to feelings of purpose, drive, and excitement, leaders can experience stress, disappoint, and burn out. That’s where resiliency comes in.

 

What is Resiliency?

To be resilient is to be capable of overcoming in the face of adversity. When things aren’t going as planned, a resilient person can pivot and motivate the team to create a different plan for success. Even if they are uncertain or nervous, they don’t back down from a challenge. Instead, they assess the situation, analyze their options, and establish a path forward.

 

How Can I Acquire Resiliency?

While some people are simply born with an attitude of resiliency, it’s also possible to acquire it. There are three main characteristics that you can develop to become resilient.

 

  • Build an attitude of acceptance. Often, non-resiliency stems from our inability to accept circumstances that go against what we had planned. Get good at saying “I wasn’t expecting this, but looks like this is what we’re working with. Let’s go.” Resilient people can roll with the punches.
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  • Trust yourself. When things don’t go your way, it’s vital that you trust your abilities to respond in the correct way.
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  • Embrace teamwork. Few great things were ever accomplished alone. Get comfortable asking for help or feedback. Your team is there to support you, use that resource.
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    The Resilience Ripple Effect

    Resilient people lead resilient businesses. In the same way that a leader must be able to bounce back when struck with a challenge, businesses must be able to do the same. The business’s resilience doesn’t simply affect its leader, it affects the team, the stakeholders, and the customers. Therefore, it is imperative that the leader of the organization is prepared to demonstrate resiliency in the face of adversity in a moment’s notice.

    If you don’t feel strong in the area of resiliency yet, don’t worry. You will get many chances in your career and life to continue to practice it. Remember – accept circumstances, trust yourself and look for help from those around. That skill will be your strength in no time.

     

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    About Debi

    Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

     

    Ready to take your career to the next level? 

    Let’s chat. Schedule a complimentary call to discuss innovative solutions to your specific needs.

     

Social media is the new frontier. It’s amazing how in only 15 or so years, our entire world has gone digital. Nowadays, you can connect with friends, family, and complete strangers at the touch of a button. Scary, isn’t it?

But how can social media help you during your job search? Take advantage of your social media presence and use it to boost your chances to nab the interview. Let’s discuss the 3 things you must remember when using social media during your job search.

 

Look Beyond LinkedIn

Remember that LinkedIn is not the only way that you can connect with others while on the job hunt. Embrace Facebook, Twitter, Reddit forums and more. Many companies choose to share on social media when they are hiring, so checking hashtags such as #hiringnow, #applynow, etc. can be a great place to start. There are also groups that you can join to network, encourage, and share prospective job opportunities with others.

And don’t forget, if you’re in the interview and the time is appropriate, feel free to bring up something that the company posted on their social media accounts. This shows that you took the time to research the company beyond simply perusing the website. Definitely an added boost!

 

Do Some Clean Up

Ensure that your personal social media is in tip top shape. It should go without saying, but everything that you are putting out there should clean, professional, and what you would have no problem with your future boss seeing. Nowadays, it should be assumed that a recruiter will be looking at your social media, so ensure that you are representing yourself well. In a study performed by CareerBuilder, 70% of employers shared that they check social media during the recruiting process. And even more alarming, over 54% of employers have also chosen to not hire a candidate based on their social media content. It matters!

 

Show Off

While your social media should be clean and professional, it doesn’t have to be rigid and boring. Have fun with it! Social media is an avenue to connect with others, and it’s okay to treat it as such. Share about the positive things that interest you, talk about your recent trip that gave you a new perspective, be a human. Social media is an excellent way to show off the absolute best parts of you. Recruiters aren’t just looking for robots to complete tasks, they want their employees to be well-rounded individuals, too. Social media is a great way to display that.

 

Do keep in mind, though, that in a world constantly looking for the next social media platform to try out, it really is okay to remain offline. Unless you are looking to become the next greatest YouTuber or influencer, social media is not a requirement when on the job hunt, and you shouldn’t feel pressure to have it unless you want to. Do what works for you.

 

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About Debi

Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

 

Ready to take your career to the next level? 

Let’s chat. Schedule a complimentary call to discuss innovative solutions to your specific needs.

Performance reviews are scary, even when receiving excellent feedback. But what if you don’t receive glowing remarks? What if your boss shares less than ideal feedback with you? A negative review can truly feel like a slap in the face, especially if you didn’t see it coming. However, it is possible to not only recover, but come back even stronger after a less than glowing review. Read on to learn our tips for bouncing back.

 

Allow Yourself to Process

Chances are, you feel embarrassed, ashamed and a little defeated. This is normal and okay. No one likes being reminded of their faults, especially by an individual in authority. If you are in the meeting, stick with a simple “I understand, thank you for the feedback”. Don’t immediately react and try to explain yourself. Instead, give yourself time to process your emotions and thoughts. You want to ensure that when you do come back to your boss, you’re ready to have a neutral, constructive conversation about how to successfully move forward in a way that works for both of you.

 

Get Honest with Yourself

This tends to be the hardest part. But get really honest with yourself. Your boss didn’t pull that negative feedback out of thin air. There had to be a definitive reason they had less than glowing remarks to share. Sit down and write down what they said, and then make a list of what you did, or didn’t do, for them to reach that conclusion. Did you miss too many deadlines in a row? Were you taking days to respond to emails that would have taken 5 minutes to read and reply to? The first step to becoming better is recognizing your faults. Only then can you make a plan to fix them.

 

Create a Game Plan

Now that you know where you’ve messed up, it’s time to define your plan to becoming better. For every negative item on your list, write out an actionable step you can take to improve. If you struggled with being late to meetings, write out how you will add a reminder to your calendar for 5 minutes before each meeting to ensure you’ll be there on time. If you procrastinated on a past project, create a time management chart that you can apply to future projects to ensure success.

 

Share with Your Boss

Let your boss know that you’ve taken their feedback to heart, and share your plan to improve. This doesn’t have to be a long, serious meeting, but just a few minutes to say “I appreciated your feedback and am ready to get things right. Here is how I’m going to do it”. The way we handle criticism is incredibly indicative of our character, and if done correctly, this conversation will wow your leader. However, be mindful that actions speak louder than words. So only share if you know that you will truly follow through. Because let me assure you, they will be watching.

 

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About Debi

Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

 

Ready to take your career to the next level? 

Let’s chat. Schedule a call to discuss innovative solutions to your specific needs.

We’ve all faced a “No” at some point in life. Whether by a family member, potential significant other, a higher education institution, or…..in our workplace.

 

Rejection at work doesn’t just happen when you don’t receive a job offer. It can happen day in and day out by a co-worker, a boss, or a client.

 

Sometimes it’s worth it to push and try to get your way. Other times, its best to pull back and re-evaluate. But what if you’re the individual doing the rejecting? Keep reading to learn about each situation, and how you should handle it.

 

When to Push

Deciding when to push and when to pull back is all about reading the room. Assess the individual and the situation. If this person is a co-worker, it could be worth it to say to them that you respectfully disagree, and maybe you both should bring in a third party to receive an outside opinion. Then, talk to an additional co-worker or your boss and get their perspective. Note: This is not an argument nor is anyone “winning”. You are simply receiving the perspective of someone outside the situation.

You can also push if you have empirical data backing up your reasoning. You should only push against a leader if you have this evidence. Otherwise, you can come across as disrespectful or unable to take instruction. And if you do provide evidence, be positive that it is accurate. You are already taking a risk pushing against their decision, you don’t want to embarrass yourself, or worse, cost yourself your job, by arguing with false data.

 

When to Pull Back

While pushing for what you believe is correct is important, sometimes it’s a better career move to pull back. If you are in a disagreement with a co-worker and a third party has sided with them, you should recoil. Typically, you have one shot to push. After that, you need to pull back and accept the circumstance. Otherwise, you will start to be seen in a negative light.

Also, if you disagree with a leader, but you do not have any hard reasoning to back up your opinion, you need to pull back. They are in a leadership position and you are not. It is disrespectful and inappropriate to argue with them when you have zero data beyond simply how you feel.

 

 

What If You’re the Rejecter?

So, what if you’re the person doing the rejecting? First and foremost, try to see the other side. In the same way that you believe you are right, they believe they are right too. And both of you want what’s best for the company. If they have evidence that backs up their thoughts, don’t hesitate to look it over and consider changing your position. Don’t be so arrogant that you make a poor decision simply because you want to be “right”. Keep the interest of the company as priority.

Secondly, be kind. This individual has shown great courage by vocally disagreeing with you. Even if you are correct and they are wrong, take a few minutes to calmly and kindly share your reasoning. Now is not the time to puff your chest. In fact, the most powerful thing you can do is be thoughtful and understanding.

 

While rejection can be difficult to take and even to give, there are ways to navigate through it. While rejection can hurt, we must remember that in a professional setting, they are not saying no to you, they are saying no to what you are saying or offering.

Start learning your personal style on responding to rejection by practicing the tips outlined for you.

 

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About Debi

Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

 

Ready to take your career to the next level? 

Let’s chat. Schedule a call to discuss innovative solutions to your specific needs.

 

At some point in your career, whether on your first day of “real” work, when you’ve received a promotion to a leadership role, or even in your day-to-day, its likely that you’ve experienced imposter syndrome. The crippling voice in the back of your head whispering “You don’t belong here”, “They’re going to find out that you aren’t good enough for this”, “You’re a fraud”.

Imposter syndrome is a natural human condition, and it’s important to recognize that everyone (yes, everyone!) experiences it at some point in their life. However, it is possible to minimize the effects of imposter syndrome. Read on to learn about the strategies you can implement to abolish your insecurities and set yourself on the pathway to confidence.

 

Recognize you aren’t alone

First and foremost, understand that everyone struggles with imposter syndrome at some point in their lives. In a study recorded in the International Journal of Behavioral Science, an estimated 70% of people experience imposter syndrome, and it affects men and women equally.

Even more difficult today is that individuals must face imposter syndrome in the age of social media. In an article by Forbes, we are reminded that social media, including professional platforms like LinkedIn, sets our expectations on unattainable goals, because chances are, those successes aren’t completely accurate and you aren’t seeing the full picture.

 

Let the perfectionism go

You are going to utterly fail so many times. And guess what? It’s going to be okay and you’re going to move on. Absolutely no one is perfect, and some of the most successful people failed miserably at different points in their careers. In fact, its rumored that the legendary inventor, Thomas Edison, made over 1,000 unsuccessful attempts to create a lightbulb. One thousand. Yet he still did it.

Let go of the idea that you have to do everything correctly and on the first try. It’s okay to make mistakes. What matters is how you handle it and move forward.

 

Recognize your own successes

When you get in your head about feeling unworthy, take a moment to write down all the positive contributions you’ve made. It’s really hard to argue with factual evidence. If you begin feeling unworthy of your new leadership role, start listing off everything you’ve done that led you to earn that promotion. Did you spend years on your education? Did you receive glowing remarks during your reviews? What skills are you capable of? Make a written list of everything that you can and have offered. There was no mistake, you are where you are for a reason.

 

Imposter syndrome is real. But the stories you are telling yourself aren’t. It affects us all, but you ultimately choose if you are going to put them into perspective.

 

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About Debi

Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

 

Ready to take your career to the next level? 

Let’s chat. Schedule a call to discuss innovative solutions to your specific needs.

What do you want to be when you grow up?

From childhood through college, almost every individual is asked a variation of this question at some point in their lives. What are you interested in pursuing? What job do you want to do? Where do you want to work?

However, it seems that once that first job offer is received, the questions cease. Sometimes we even stop asking ourselves what we want to do.  Why is this?

Regularly evaluating and pinpointing what you want to do (or, “be when you grow up”) is a healthy strategy to play an active role in your own life and not just accept the current circumstances. It’s good for you. Taking the time to ask yourself what you want to do and where you want to be in the future is the first step to designing the career you’ve dreamed of.

 

So, what is a Career Map?

A career map is a written, typed, or drawn out format that visually organizes steps in your career. It allows you to see exactly where you’ve been and where you are. So then, you can begin to process getting to where you want to be.

 

Career maps are beneficial because they allow you to break down a lofty goal into smaller, manageable steps. You identify where you are, where you’re going, and then decipher the stepping stones in between.

 

What’s Included in a Career Map?

In career mapping, it’s important to start with where you want to end up. This isn’t a permanent decision, but it helps identify what milestones are needed to get there. So, if your dream is to become a manager at your current company, that’s where to begin.

 

Next, write down where you’ve been, and where you are now. Do most individuals get promoted to manager after 5 years at the company, and you’re currently at 3 years? Write that down. Do you already have certain skills and qualifications that a manager needs? Make a note of these.

 

Now, start filling in the gaps with the milestones needed. Add those additional 2 years you need to become eligible. Write down the necessary Master’s degree. Add the required public speaking skills.

 

What Does a Career Map Look Like?

Career maps don’t have to be fancy. Using the example above, here is a super simple career map that effectively organizes your career.

 

End goal: Manager at Current Company

Starting Point: Advanced Analyst

 

Milestone 1: Enroll in local 2-year MBA program

Milestone 2: Begin taking on tasks at work requiring public speaking skills to refine your abilities

Milestone 3: Complete 2 additional years at company and graduate MBA program

Milestone 4: Apply for Manager role

Yes, it’s that easy. And its effective. Give it a shot and let us know what you think!

 

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About Debi

Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

 

Ready to take your career to the next level? 

Let’s chat. Schedule a call to discuss innovative solutions to your specific needs.