Performance reviews are scary, even when receiving excellent feedback. But what if you don’t receive glowing remarks? What if your boss shares less than ideal feedback with you? A negative review can truly feel like a slap in the face, especially if you didn’t see it coming. However, it is possible to not only recover, but come back even stronger after a less than glowing review. Read on to learn our tips for bouncing back.

 

Allow Yourself to Process

Chances are, you feel embarrassed, ashamed and a little defeated. This is normal and okay. No one likes being reminded of their faults, especially by an individual in authority. If you are in the meeting, stick with a simple “I understand, thank you for the feedback”. Don’t immediately react and try to explain yourself. Instead, give yourself time to process your emotions and thoughts. You want to ensure that when you do come back to your boss, you’re ready to have a neutral, constructive conversation about how to successfully move forward in a way that works for both of you.

 

Get Honest with Yourself

This tends to be the hardest part. But get really honest with yourself. Your boss didn’t pull that negative feedback out of thin air. There had to be a definitive reason they had less than glowing remarks to share. Sit down and write down what they said, and then make a list of what you did, or didn’t do, for them to reach that conclusion. Did you miss too many deadlines in a row? Were you taking days to respond to emails that would have taken 5 minutes to read and reply to? The first step to becoming better is recognizing your faults. Only then can you make a plan to fix them.

 

Create a Game Plan

Now that you know where you’ve messed up, it’s time to define your plan to becoming better. For every negative item on your list, write out an actionable step you can take to improve. If you struggled with being late to meetings, write out how you will add a reminder to your calendar for 5 minutes before each meeting to ensure you’ll be there on time. If you procrastinated on a past project, create a time management chart that you can apply to future projects to ensure success.

 

Share with Your Boss

Let your boss know that you’ve taken their feedback to heart, and share your plan to improve. This doesn’t have to be a long, serious meeting, but just a few minutes to say “I appreciated your feedback and am ready to get things right. Here is how I’m going to do it”. The way we handle criticism is incredibly indicative of our character, and if done correctly, this conversation will wow your leader. However, be mindful that actions speak louder than words. So only share if you know that you will truly follow through. Because let me assure you, they will be watching.

 

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About Debi

Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

 

Ready to take your career to the next level? 

Let’s chat. Schedule a call to discuss innovative solutions to your specific needs.

We’ve all faced a “No” at some point in life. Whether by a family member, potential significant other, a higher education institution, or…..in our workplace.

 

Rejection at work doesn’t just happen when you don’t receive a job offer. It can happen day in and day out by a co-worker, a boss, or a client.

 

Sometimes it’s worth it to push and try to get your way. Other times, its best to pull back and re-evaluate. But what if you’re the individual doing the rejecting? Keep reading to learn about each situation, and how you should handle it.

 

When to Push

Deciding when to push and when to pull back is all about reading the room. Assess the individual and the situation. If this person is a co-worker, it could be worth it to say to them that you respectfully disagree, and maybe you both should bring in a third party to receive an outside opinion. Then, talk to an additional co-worker or your boss and get their perspective. Note: This is not an argument nor is anyone “winning”. You are simply receiving the perspective of someone outside the situation.

You can also push if you have empirical data backing up your reasoning. You should only push against a leader if you have this evidence. Otherwise, you can come across as disrespectful or unable to take instruction. And if you do provide evidence, be positive that it is accurate. You are already taking a risk pushing against their decision, you don’t want to embarrass yourself, or worse, cost yourself your job, by arguing with false data.

 

When to Pull Back

While pushing for what you believe is correct is important, sometimes it’s a better career move to pull back. If you are in a disagreement with a co-worker and a third party has sided with them, you should recoil. Typically, you have one shot to push. After that, you need to pull back and accept the circumstance. Otherwise, you will start to be seen in a negative light.

Also, if you disagree with a leader, but you do not have any hard reasoning to back up your opinion, you need to pull back. They are in a leadership position and you are not. It is disrespectful and inappropriate to argue with them when you have zero data beyond simply how you feel.

 

 

What If You’re the Rejecter?

So, what if you’re the person doing the rejecting? First and foremost, try to see the other side. In the same way that you believe you are right, they believe they are right too. And both of you want what’s best for the company. If they have evidence that backs up their thoughts, don’t hesitate to look it over and consider changing your position. Don’t be so arrogant that you make a poor decision simply because you want to be “right”. Keep the interest of the company as priority.

Secondly, be kind. This individual has shown great courage by vocally disagreeing with you. Even if you are correct and they are wrong, take a few minutes to calmly and kindly share your reasoning. Now is not the time to puff your chest. In fact, the most powerful thing you can do is be thoughtful and understanding.

 

While rejection can be difficult to take and even to give, there are ways to navigate through it. While rejection can hurt, we must remember that in a professional setting, they are not saying no to you, they are saying no to what you are saying or offering.

Start learning your personal style on responding to rejection by practicing the tips outlined for you.

 

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About Debi

Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

 

Ready to take your career to the next level? 

Let’s chat. Schedule a call to discuss innovative solutions to your specific needs.

 

At some point in your career, whether on your first day of “real” work, when you’ve received a promotion to a leadership role, or even in your day-to-day, its likely that you’ve experienced imposter syndrome. The crippling voice in the back of your head whispering “You don’t belong here”, “They’re going to find out that you aren’t good enough for this”, “You’re a fraud”.

Imposter syndrome is a natural human condition, and it’s important to recognize that everyone (yes, everyone!) experiences it at some point in their life. However, it is possible to minimize the effects of imposter syndrome. Read on to learn about the strategies you can implement to abolish your insecurities and set yourself on the pathway to confidence.

 

Recognize you aren’t alone

First and foremost, understand that everyone struggles with imposter syndrome at some point in their lives. In a study recorded in the International Journal of Behavioral Science, an estimated 70% of people experience imposter syndrome, and it affects men and women equally.

Even more difficult today is that individuals must face imposter syndrome in the age of social media. In an article by Forbes, we are reminded that social media, including professional platforms like LinkedIn, sets our expectations on unattainable goals, because chances are, those successes aren’t completely accurate and you aren’t seeing the full picture.

 

Let the perfectionism go

You are going to utterly fail so many times. And guess what? It’s going to be okay and you’re going to move on. Absolutely no one is perfect, and some of the most successful people failed miserably at different points in their careers. In fact, its rumored that the legendary inventor, Thomas Edison, made over 1,000 unsuccessful attempts to create a lightbulb. One thousand. Yet he still did it.

Let go of the idea that you have to do everything correctly and on the first try. It’s okay to make mistakes. What matters is how you handle it and move forward.

 

Recognize your own successes

When you get in your head about feeling unworthy, take a moment to write down all the positive contributions you’ve made. It’s really hard to argue with factual evidence. If you begin feeling unworthy of your new leadership role, start listing off everything you’ve done that led you to earn that promotion. Did you spend years on your education? Did you receive glowing remarks during your reviews? What skills are you capable of? Make a written list of everything that you can and have offered. There was no mistake, you are where you are for a reason.

 

Imposter syndrome is real. But the stories you are telling yourself aren’t. It affects us all, but you ultimately choose if you are going to put them into perspective.

 

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About Debi

Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

 

Ready to take your career to the next level? 

Let’s chat. Schedule a call to discuss innovative solutions to your specific needs.

What do you want to be when you grow up?

From childhood through college, almost every individual is asked a variation of this question at some point in their lives. What are you interested in pursuing? What job do you want to do? Where do you want to work?

However, it seems that once that first job offer is received, the questions cease. Sometimes we even stop asking ourselves what we want to do.  Why is this?

Regularly evaluating and pinpointing what you want to do (or, “be when you grow up”) is a healthy strategy to play an active role in your own life and not just accept the current circumstances. It’s good for you. Taking the time to ask yourself what you want to do and where you want to be in the future is the first step to designing the career you’ve dreamed of.

 

So, what is a Career Map?

A career map is a written, typed, or drawn out format that visually organizes steps in your career. It allows you to see exactly where you’ve been and where you are. So then, you can begin to process getting to where you want to be.

 

Career maps are beneficial because they allow you to break down a lofty goal into smaller, manageable steps. You identify where you are, where you’re going, and then decipher the stepping stones in between.

 

What’s Included in a Career Map?

In career mapping, it’s important to start with where you want to end up. This isn’t a permanent decision, but it helps identify what milestones are needed to get there. So, if your dream is to become a manager at your current company, that’s where to begin.

 

Next, write down where you’ve been, and where you are now. Do most individuals get promoted to manager after 5 years at the company, and you’re currently at 3 years? Write that down. Do you already have certain skills and qualifications that a manager needs? Make a note of these.

 

Now, start filling in the gaps with the milestones needed. Add those additional 2 years you need to become eligible. Write down the necessary Master’s degree. Add the required public speaking skills.

 

What Does a Career Map Look Like?

Career maps don’t have to be fancy. Using the example above, here is a super simple career map that effectively organizes your career.

 

End goal: Manager at Current Company

Starting Point: Advanced Analyst

 

Milestone 1: Enroll in local 2-year MBA program

Milestone 2: Begin taking on tasks at work requiring public speaking skills to refine your abilities

Milestone 3: Complete 2 additional years at company and graduate MBA program

Milestone 4: Apply for Manager role

Yes, it’s that easy. And its effective. Give it a shot and let us know what you think!

 

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About Debi

Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

 

Ready to take your career to the next level? 

Let’s chat. Schedule a call to discuss innovative solutions to your specific needs.

 

Every day, you make many decisions. From choosing meals for lunch, picking a weather-appropriate outfit, and finalizing a corporate deal, you have plenty on your plate at any given time. When we have multiple options when making decisions, indecisiveness can creep in. Of course, no one wants to regret opportunities lost due to wrong judgment and assessment.

So, can you get better at making decisions? Continue reading to find out ways to enhance your decision-making ability.

Avoid Delay

Making simple decisions are easy and fun. You simply add them to your to-do list and then check them off as you go along. However, when critical business situations aren’t as easy to make decisions on, delay can occur. To avoid this, dedicate some time each day to assess the risk, pros, cons, and most importantly, realistic outcomes of your possible decision. This is called a cost-benefit analysis. Make sure you consider the after-effects and consequences of your decision.
 

Narrow Down Your Options

Knowing that you have too many options or choices will not let you make a final decision easily. Also, more options can lead to regret as you consider the missed possibilities or opportunities. Narrowing down available choices can filter the best options to select from plus elevates FOMO (fear of missing out).
 

Be Objective and Shelve Your Emotions

Decision making often becomes difficult when you get too involved or invest yourself personally in the outcomes of your possible decision. But remember, you need to solve the problem objectively. The best way to do it is to list down the potential outcomes of the decision you intend to make and put all your emotions aside. You must focus on the facts, even if it requires accepting your shortcomings as you make decisions.
 

Always Do Research

Of course, making a good decision is not possible without doing research.  It is especially true when you have to make major decisions. You need to put in a significant amount of time and effort to gather all the necessary details to lessen the chances of failure.
 

Seek Expert Advice

Remember that the problem that you’re trying to solve is unique to you. Many people have probably encountered and solved the same problem. If you know someone who has bumped up against this decision before, reach out for some assistance. If you don’t know someone, research some experts in the domain to see who may be able to help. This helps save you time and allows you to look at it from an approach you may not have considered before.

Final Verdict

All in all, good decisions don’t follow rules. But you can still learn how to make the best decisions given the options available to you to make informed decisions.

 

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About Debi

Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

 

Ready to take your career to the next level? 

Let’s chat. Schedule a complimentary call to discuss innovative solutions to your specific needs.

 

So you’ve been in your current position for quite some time now and you’re considering switching roles in your company – how exciting! Changing roles opens the door for growth, challenge, and opportunity. But first, you must conquer the interview.

Internal interviews are in a class of their own. They aren’t necessarily easier than interviewing with a new company, but they aren’t particularly harder either. They’re simply different.

Read on to learn our top tips for internal interviewing.

 

Don’t Keep Secrets
Before anything else, if you’ve been asked to interview for a position with a different manager, ensure that your current manager is aware of what’s potentially coming. You don’t need to have their permission, per se, but it’s good business practice to give them a heads up so they aren’t caught off guard. Rumors travel fast, so be sure to tell them sooner rather than later. You don’t want them to hear it from someone else. And remember, they don’t need to know every reason why you’re interviewing for a different position (better pay, better work assignments, co-worker relationships), they simply need to know that there is a possibility they might need to look for a new hire.

 

Honesty Only
Secondly, be honest. This should go without saying, but don’t try to pull a fast one on the interviewer. Often in external interviews, candidates carefully curate what is discussed, and make sure to hide any non-ideal information. Your current company is very aware of your experience at the company so far. The good, bad, and ugly. Don’t try to cover up or twist anything in your favor, the interviewer will know. Instead, if asked about a difficult moment, be honest. Share transparently what happened, how you handled it, and what you would do differently next time. Mistakes happen and the interviewer knows that. What matters is how you learned from the experience.

 

Take Advantage of Company Knowledge
While the interviewer being aware of your past can occasionally be stressful, it’s also your biggest advantage. Your company is well-aware of the excellent work that you’ve done, and when answering interview questions, go extra in-depth about those accomplishments. Because the interview is conducted with those who are a part of the company, you are welcome to share specifics on the work that you’ve completed. There’s no need to broadly explain concepts and try to fit a situational background into one sentence.

 

Don’t Forget the Follow Up  
Just because this interview is internal, it doesn’t mean that traditional interviewing steps should go out the window. Like external interviews, it’s important to follow up. Ensure that as soon as the interview is over and you’re back at your desk, you are writing and sending a thank you letter. And because you’re already at the office, feel free to handwrite it. Thank you notes are important and can often be that small edge that gets you the position.

 

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About Debi
Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

 

Ready to take your career to the next level? 

Let’s chat. Schedule a complimentary call to discuss innovative solutions to your specific needs.

Bringing about a culture change in your company can be a challenging process. People, just like an organization, are complex and the difficulty of changing habits and set thought patterns can be difficult. You know this personally if you’ve ever tried to change up a daily habit. However, without properly engaging your employees in the change process you cannot expect to successfully drive and sustain a culture change.

Employee Engagement
Employee engagement is vital to business success. And as you navigate through changing your company culture having your employees engaged will make your transition that much easier. During a culture change, leaders should make it a priority to ensure that employees are engaged. This starts with you being genuine and open, allowing employees to feel that they are heard and empowered.

When employees are engaged, they understand and align with the company values and are dedicated to the company mission. This generates loyalty towards the company and a motivation to perform at their best. They feel empowered to pay an active role and make a difference. When you make employees feel included and part of the process they become your partners in driving the culture change that you desire.

Communication Strategy
When you start with a culture change in your organization it’s important to have a strategy for how you want to go about employee engagement. This is where you choose your narrative and decide how to reach employees. It’s even more important if your workforce spans over more than one location as in these times most employees are working remotely.

It’s also important to be thoroughly prepared and make sure the information you’re sharing is accurate and reliable. Update and communicate with the employees on a regular basis. Your communication does not need to be lengthy lectures. Instead, keep your message simple, easy to understand, and consistent. Be sure to focus on the “why” behind the culture change as well.

Here are some tips for employee engagement during a culture change:

1. Create a network
Changing a culture is more than just sending out memos and hoping employees will get your idea. It’s about how you present yourself and engage directly with the people that make up the company. Create a network of people that you communicate with regularly. This will be your place to share your thoughts and lessons and get advice on important issues that come up.

2. Encourage feedback
Engagement is a two-way street. The best way to encourage employee engagement is to get their feedback. Whatever changes you’re making in the company culture ask your employees to give their feedback on it. When you do implement changes based on the feedback, share it with them.

3. Visual display
A great way to bring your culture to life is through the use of symbols, artifacts, and pieces of art that represent your culture. This can include your company values on t-shirts and other merchandise or planning rituals and building traditions around your culture. This is a physical reminder of what the company values most.

4. Create meaning
People are more likely to understand and adapt to a culture change when they find meaning in it. Allow your employees to make sense of the change on their own which allows the change process is smoother. Let your employees absorb the information, ask questions, and express what the change means to them. Create opportunities for them to process the culture change.

5. Own the change
To get your employees engaged and excited about the change, company leaders should start by owning the change and adapting the new mindsets themselves. It’s hard to change employee mindsets if they believe that the change is only about the bottom line and they are not valued as people. When you embrace the mindset you want to bring to the company you’ll inspire your staff to follow.

During this process, it is important to find ways to build trust with your employees. When you go beyond words, live by the values you want to implement, and show your employees that they’re valued, it will lead to a healthy relationship with them. Then find ways to enjoy the culture you wish to bring. Live your values and have fun while you’re doing it. This will draw others in and encourage them to follow.

“Corporate culture matters. How management chooses to treat its people impacts everything – for better or for worse.” – Simon Sinek

The quote above from the leadership guru Simon Sinek is a testimony to the importance of a company’s culture. Company culture is one of the most important yet most often overlooked part of a company. In order to stay successful and relevant in the long run, company culture plays a major role.

What is company culture?
Company culture, also referred to as organizational culture or workplace culture, can be defined as the set of values, attitudes, and characteristics of an organization. It is reflected in what people value at a company, the way they interact and communicate with each other, and their decisions. Several elements make up and influence a company’s culture. These include company vision and mission, style of leadership, workplace environment, business ethics, values, and company goals as well as expectations.

How Do I Know It’s Time for a Change?
It’s not always easy to recognize when it’s time for organizational culture change. The signs are not always obvious and it’s easy to confuse general company problems with an issue with company culture. Most of the time, a culture shift happens organically but there are times when companies and leaders need to actively drive the culture change. So how will you know it’s time for a culture change?

Here are some sure signs it’s time for a change:

1. Low financial performance
If company profits are plummeting and there’s no clear reason behind it such as changes to the economy or customer base, then it’s likely that your culture needs some change. Studies have shown a link between a company’s culture and its financial performance. The organizational culture research firm Great Place to Work reported in one study that the 13 companies that are consistently on Fortune’s list of Best Companies to Work For also reported increased average annual returns.

2. Employees are reluctant to communicate
Effective and open communication is essential for the health of any organization. With a healthy company culture, employees feel comfortable to communicate up and down the organizational structure. They do not hesitate to give feedback that is important for team leaders and managers. If you feel that employees are not sharing feedback or are hesitant to communicate especially during difficult times, then it could be a sign that its’s time for a shift in company culture.

3. Employees find it hard to reach consensus
Successful organizations recognize the benefits of having a diverse group of employees with different backgrounds. The coming together of diverse ideas and approaches helps teams find innovative and creative solutions. However, if you notice that your team is consistently finding it difficult to reach a consensus, it may indicate an issue with the company culture.

4. Low employee engagement
Employee engagement is a mark of good organizational health. It leads to more productivity and better company performance. Your employees are what keep the company going. If you feel that engagement levels are falling and it’s impacting your business, it’s important to inspect where the company culture is at fault.

5. Resistance to change
Successful companies realize that change is the only constant and are flexible when it comes to embracing new ways of business. Remaining static is a recipe for disaster and yet many companies are resistant to change and this is where their company culture is to blame. A healthy culture is one that sees change in a positive light. If you feel that every time something new or different is introduced in your company it’s met by a strong resistance then you need to drive a culture shift to welcome change and progress.

Company culture may be cultivated through deliberate policies and actions or it may be shaped gradually over time through the collection of company decisions. A strong company culture helps employees understand what is expected of them and so they work in alignment with the culture. A positive culture keeps your employees happy and productive, impacts employee retention and helps you meet company goals.

Everyone has a leader inside of them. Don’t believe me? At some point in time, you probably have found yourself in a position to make decisions for other people. It could have been at a large gathering, at work, or even at home with your family. At the time, you probably didn’t even think about it.

What was your leadership style? Some people seek different opinions before making final decisions while others prefer to decide alone. Some leaders are very flexible in decision making to accommodate for different behaviors and personalities while others are firm and disciplined.

While there is no fixed rule on how to lead, the most important thing is to adopt the style that works for you and produces the results you seek. No matter what your style, you can always get better to gain the respect and confidence of more people and achieve even greater results.

Let’s discuss the importance of knowing your leadership style.

 

Why You Must Know Your Leadership Style

As an executive, entrepreneur, or team leader trying to progress in your field, understanding your leadership style is crucial because only then:

  • You will be able to truly hone in and take full advantage of the positive aspects of your leadership style.
  • You will understand your leadership imperfections and gain the awareness to make necessary corrections.
  • You will be able to strengthen relationships with those you lead through better communication.
  • You will grow and develop into higher leadership roles in your career.

 

So, how can you discover your leadership style?

 

Self-Evaluation

When self-evaluating, it is important to be as blunt and reflective as possible. Be honest with yourself, and honestly think through your personal strengths and weaknesses in leadership. Are you quick to stress? Are you a fantastic listener? Write down as many qualities of your leadership style as you can, good or bad. What strengths should you emphasize from now on? What roles are your weaknesses playing in your decision making?

 

Ask for Feedback

Feel free to ask the team you are leading about your style. After all, they are most affected by your leadership. Make sure the people you ask, are those that will give you honest opinions. And when approaching them, mention that you are looking for constructive feedback. Now is not the time to get defensive. If there are negatives, write them down and feel sorry for yourself later. This is valuable data that will effectively help you course-correct your leadership style as swiftly as possible.

 

Take an Online Quiz

Still perplexed about your leadership style? There are hundreds of quizzes available online which you can take to assess your leadership style and quality. These quizzes are often easy, fun, and incredibly insightful. The online tool will rate you, tell you your style, and suggest ways of improvement. Simply google “Leadership Style Quiz” and you will find many to choose from. I suggest taking several so you can see what qualities are consistently popping up for you.

 

There are many ways to lead. One style is not necessarily better than the other. The important thing is to discover the style that works best for you, your team and the organization to sharpen the strengths of that style. With a bit of self-reflection and feedback, you will be a more effective leader in no time.

 

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About Debi

Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

 

Ready to take your career to the next level?

Let’s chat. Schedule a call to discuss innovative solutions to your specific needs.

In the workplace, you are and will continue to be exposed to different leadership styles. Just as every person is unique, so is their leadership style. But, before we learn about the most common styles of leadership, let’s take a step back and discuss what leadership truly is.

Leadership is the process of inspiring individuals towards accomplishing a specific goal. The main aim of leadership is to achieve results; leaders should be able to communicate with others in a way that makes them act the way they want them to act.

Now, let’s dig into common leadership styles and tips for each one.

 

Autocratic

This older leadership style places much emphasis on obedience. Leaders using this style do not typically listen to others. Instead, they believe that their decision is the best way to go. This style of leadership can often push down other’s courage to speak up and collaborate, therefore risking the opportunity to capitalize on hidden talent.

If this is your natural leadership style, be mindful to pause and ask for input along the way. You never know what great idea could be waiting for you!

 

Laissez Faire

This style of leading is done in a hands-off way. The leader will often let others make some of the decisions without being involved. While this leadership style is laidback, a standoffish leader might not get to discover the extent of other people’s capabilities and know how best to employ skills.

If this describes you, remember there will be times you will have to step up to take hold of some situations. Also, take the time to get to know your team to pull together everyone’s core strengths.

 

Authoritative

Also known as the visionary style, authoritative leadership is the leader displaying confidence in their decisions, while also involving additional input and ideas. An authoritative leader will issue out orders to employees while taking the time to explain why a particular decision was made. With newer or uncertain teams, this leadership style is great to lean into. When there is an air of confusion or doubt in an organization, it is the job of the leader to step up and make strong decisions.

While there are many benefits to leading by this style, ensuring that employees feel heard will be vital to overall efficiency.

 

Democratic

Leading in a democratic way is done transparently. Typically, the employees are involved in decision making and are invited to provide their input too. It is a highly effective style because it can boost confidence and career development due to the collaborative nature. A democratic leader will unite the team and make them want to work harder.

While allowing leaders to guide while also welcoming collaboration from team members may be one of the most balanced leadership styles, in crisis or uncertain times, one leader may need to make the call.

 

Pacesetting

A pacesetting leader will lead by example. Extremely focused individuals can effectively lead with this style. Essentially, in this style, the leader demonstrates the standards for the team and expects the team to follow with minimal supervision. Usually, this leadership style is best for type A personalities who thrive under pressure or highly-skilled, tenured teams.

Pacesetters can fall into the trap that their team just knows what type of work is expected from them. When leading with this style, take moments to do check-ins with the team.

 

Being a leader means that you are responsible for others. You guide others towards a goal while navigating different personalities, skill levels, and work ethics. Although there are natural-born leaders who seemingly slip into a specific leadership style with no training at all, for the rest of us, leadership is something to be developed.

When you understand your leadership style, you can start testing out other styles. The most effective leaders do not limit themselves to one style. They often switch up their styles when the need arises. So, believe in yourself and your decisions. Others will follow naturally.

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About Debi

Debi is a coach to high performers, leaders and business owners wanting to achieve more and grow beyond what they believe is possible. Known for her clarifying insight and a pragmatic approach, Debi brings her clients to the next step by asking the right questions during strategy development and supporting them during strategy implementation. With experience in management, recruitment and employee development for various industries, she has a wide scope of expertise and will confidently guide you towards a successful future in your career.

 

Ready to take your career to the next level?

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